Conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh: winners, losers, and a new status quo in the Caucasus

The relatively short-lived flare-up between Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict has ended in early November with a ceasefire brokered by Russia

, CET

The relatively short-lived flare-up between Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict has ended in early November with a ceasefire brokered by Russia. With Russian peacekeepers and Turkey’s support for Azerbaijan, a new reality has emerged in the region. What does the Russia-brokered ceasefire mean for the regional balance of power? Who are the winners and losers in this war? What are the lessons for Europe?

Speakers

Richard Giragosian is the director of the Regional Studies Center, an independent think tank in Yerevan, Armenia, and serves as both a Visiting Professor at the College of Europe’s Natolin Campus and Senior Expert at Yerevan State University’s Centre for European Studies. He is also a contributing analyst for al Jazeera and Oxford Analytica, and a frequent contributor to the Asia Times and the Brussels-based New Europe newspaper. 

Fariz Ismailzade is executive Vice Rector for External, Government and Student affairs at the ADA University. Mr. Ismailzade worked as a researcher at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C and at the Embassy of Azerbaijan in the US. His research interests include political affairs in the Caucasus and Central Asia, energy security, and development.

Nicu Popescu is the director of the Wider Europe programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and he works from ECFR’s Paris office. His topics of focus include EU’s relations with Russia and the Eastern Partnership countries. In 2019 he served as Minister of Foreign Affairs and European Integration of Moldova. He also teaches at SciencesPo in Paris.

Asli Aydintasbas is a senior policy fellow with the Wider Europe programme at the European Council on Foreign Relation. Her topics of focus include Turkish foreign policy and external ramifications of its domestic politics. She has a lengthy career in journalism,  and has written for the International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, the New York  Times, Forbes, Politico, and Newsweek.

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